Saturday, January 30, 2010

Things about Emily of New Moon

L. M. Montgomery Reading Challenge


My daughter and I are reading Emily of New Moon for this challenge.

Here are some things we noticed in Emily of New Moon...

We noticed that like Anne there was an Emily-in-the-glass that she always referred to and chatted with. Emily too has an imagination just like Anne. Emily too was an orphan; however, she didn't experience orphanages as Anne did. Her destination was New Moon where her mother's people lived-the Murray family. They were a very prideful-and high group of people. Emily with her jet black hair is a total opposite of Anne with her carrot top. Anne was into literature, reading, poetry, writing as well as Emily.

When the wind blew Emily referred to it as the Wind Woman, she was always around. We loved the way she named the things in nature. A grove (group, few, etc.) trees. Adam and Eve were two big Spruce trees. The Tree of Knowledge was a squat little apple-tree with Adam and Eve standing on either side. (these are just two examples.)

Some of Emily's New Moon friends are: Aunt Laura, Cousin Jimmy, Rhoda, Ilse.
Emily finds comfort in her cat.



books

Sugar Doll blogger award


Thanks to Vicki @ Reading at the Beach for this award. It means a lot to me that she thought of my blog.

I’m supposed to list 10 things about me:

1~ I'm a pastor's wife

2~ mother of two teenage daughters

3~ I'm a ND certified teacher

4~ homeschool daughter # 2 that is still in school. Daughter #1 graduated in May from Homeshcool

5~ I'm slightly obsessed with books

6~ I've never been out of the U.S.

7~ I love to sew

8~ I can't whistle

9~ I collect apples

10~ I play the piano

I'm supposed to pass this on to 10 other bloggers. So I'm passing this on to the following bloggers.

My Reading Room
Relz Reviewz
Mary Connealy
Reading to Know
My Christian Fiction
A Christian Writer's World
Squirrel's Treehouse
Cross and Cutlass
Strong Women, Brave Stories
Kathi Macias





books

Friday, January 29, 2010

The Awesome Bond of Sisters by Virginia Smith





The Awesome Bond of Sisters
By Virginia Smith
Having a sister is like having a best friend you can't get rid of. You know whatever you do, they'll still be there. --Amy Li

My middle sister and I fought like wildcats when we were growing up. One of my most vivid childhood memories is of being forcibly separated during an argument and banished to sit together on the living room couch with orders not to get up until we could get along. I huddled against one arm and resigned myself to living on that two-foot square cushion for the next eleven years, when I would turn eighteen and could get my own apartment. After an eternity, Mom entered the room to mediate. “Girls,” she said, “you are sisters. There will never be another person in the world more closely related to you than your sister. So you’d better learn to get along, because someday one of you might need a kidney.” Not, perhaps, the most convincing argument for reconciliation ever presented, but it worked. For the moment, anyway.

A woman has many relationships in her life, but the bond between sisters is unique. There is the biological link, but the connection goes beyond that. Sisters enjoy a shared past. They experienced many of the same events that molded their personalities, and therefore they understand one another in a way no one else can. They speak the same shorthand. If one of my sisters says, “I know! Let’s put on a show!” we all laugh, because we remember the first time one of us said that, and the resulting spectacle that has become family legend.

Sisters “get” each other without having to go into all the background. When I’ve had an argument with my husband, I can call my sisters and say, “He doesn’t want a puppy. I think I may divorce him.” My sisters understand my reaction immediately, because they remember witnessing our parents’ argument over the same subject. They can talk me down from the ledge, and away from the divorce attorneys. And they will do this even if I call them at three o’clock in the morning, with only a minimum amount of grumbling about the loss of sleep.

Psychologist Marcia Millman, author of The Perfect Sister, said during an interview, “I think sisters can help repair the injuries of childhood.” That’s certainly been true in my family. Whenever we get together, our husbands cover yawns and eventually slip away to the other room to watch a ballgame while we rehash events of our childhood, and discuss how they have impacted us as adults. Often I come away with a new perspective and a better attitude, so gatherings with my sisters are sort of like group therapy sessions. Only less expensive.

While it’s true that we share a common past, even sisters experience different events while growing up in the same household. I like to remind both of my sisters that, being the oldest, I blazed the trail for them. They both got their ears pierced sooner than I did, and wore lipstick, and shaved their legs. They were both allowed to date at an earlier age than I was, and stay out later. There are ten years between my youngest sister and me, so by the time she became a teenager, I had successfully driven our parents into a state of exhausted stupor, and she got to do pretty much whatever she wanted. (Which I still think is totally unfair, but that’s the way it is in most families, I’ve learned.) I think she owes me big-time.

My sisters and I do still have the occasional conflict. Author Linda Sunshine said, “If you don’t understand how a woman could both love her sister dearly and want to wring her neck at the same time, then you were probably an only child.” Our arguments don’t become physical anymore (we all understand the importance of good hair now, so we are no longer tempted to grab a handful), but these days, being at odds with one of my sisters is far more painful than our childhood brawls.

Several years ago, my middle sister and I had a disagreement and didn’t speak to each other for a few days. I was miserable without her, but we both stubbornly refused to back down. While cooking dinner one evening, I dropped a glass measuring cup she had given me, and it shattered. When it did, my stubbornness broke into a million pieces. My husband brought the phone to me where I sat sobbing on the floor, surrounded by shards of glass, and said sternly, “Call your sister.” Never has a reunion been so sweet.

Someone once said that relationships between siblings are the most long-lasting and influential of all. My sisters have been a part of my life longer than my husband or my children, and they will be part of my life even after our parents are gone. They know me, and understand me, and they like me anyway. They’re one of the best blessings God has given me. And as Mom said, if I ever do need a kidney, I know who to call.








8 Tips for Maintaining a Relationship with your Sister
In today’s busy world, it’s easy to let a relationship slide. That’s true regardless of whether you live nearby or far apart. Here are some tips for maintaining a strong relationship with your sister.

Scheduled Phone Calls – Communication is the key to any relationship, so don’t leave it to chance. Select a specific day each week for an uninterrupted phone call. Put your sister on your cell phone “Favorites” so you can talk free.

Text Messages – Texting is the preferred method of communication for one of my sisters. Be sure you have unlimited texts on your cell phone plan.

Utilize the Internet – Email and social networking sites like Facebook are wonderful ways to stay connected. On Goodreads and LibraryThing you can keep track of what your sister is reading, too.

Skype – If you both have a computer with a camera, this software allows you see each other while you talk – and it’s free.

Letters – Email is wonderful, but there’s nothing like reading your sister’s words in her own handwriting.

Cards – Next time you browse the card shelves, pick up several funny ones and tuck them away in a drawer. Send one every so often to surprise your sister with a laugh.

Sister Sleepovers – Even if you live near one another, there’s nothing like getting away from it all with your sister. Schedule an annual sleepover at a lodge, or hotel, or even at someone’s house. Leave the kids at home, and focus on having fun with each other.

Start a Tradition – Create a tradition you share only with your sister. For instance, my sister and I exchange ugly ornaments at Christmas every year. We spend months shopping for the ugliest ornament we can find, and love the competition of seeing who “wins” that year.

Read Virginia's interview and a grand prize drawing here.

Virginia Smith is the author of a dozen Christian novels including the Sister-to-Sister Series, which is based in large part on her relationship with her own sisters. Stuck in the Middle was a finalist for the 2009 ACFW Book of the Year award. Her newest book, Third Time’s a Charm, the third and final book in the series, is now available wherever books are sold. Learn more about Ginny and her books, and
enter a Prize Bonanza Giveaway, at
www.VirginiaSmith.org.


Paperback: 336 pages
Publisher: Revell
Release: January 1, 2010
ISBN-10: 0800732340
ISBN-13: 978-0800732349
Retail: $14.99

A copy of this book was provided for review by KCWC






books

Thursday, January 28, 2010

Becca By The Book by Laura Jensen Walker



This week, the


Christian Fiction Blog Alliance


is introducing


Becca By The Book


Zondervan (January 1, 2010)


by


Laura Jensen Walker






ABOUT THE AUTHOR:





Laura Jensen Walker is an award-winning writer, popular speaker, and breast-cancer survivor who loves to touch readers and audiences with the healing power of laughter.



Born in Racine, Wisconsin (home of Western Printing and Johnson’s Wax—maker of your favorite floor care products) Laura moved to Phoenix, Arizona when she was in high school. But not being a fan of blazing heat and knowing that Uncle Sam was looking for a few good women, she enlisted in the United States Air Force shortly after graduation and spent the next five years flying a typewriter through Europe.



Her lifelong dream of writing fiction came true in Spring 2005 with the release of her first chick lit novel, Dreaming in Black & White which won the Contemporary Fiction Book of the Year from American Christian Fiction Writers. Her sophomore novel, Dreaming in Technicolor was published in Fall 2005.



Laura’s third novel, Reconstructing Natalie, chosen as the Women of Faith Novel of the Year for 2006, is the funny and poignant story of a young, single woman who gets breast cancer and how her life is reconstructed as a result. This book was born out of Laura’s cancer speaking engagements where she started meeting younger and younger women stricken with this disease—some whose husbands had left them, and others who wondered what breast cancer would do to their dating life. She wanted to write a novel that would give voice to those women. Something real. And honest. And funny.



Because although cancer isn’t funny, humor is healing.



To learn more about Laura’s latest novels, please check out her Books page.



A popular speaker and teacher at writing conferences, Laura has also been a guest on hundreds of radio and TV shows around the country including the ABC Weekend News, The 700 Club, and The Jay Thomas Morning Show.



She lives in Northern California with her Renaissance-man husband Michael, and Gracie, their piano playing dog.





ABOUT THE BOOK





Sales clerk, barista, telemarketer, sign waver...



At twenty-five, free-spirited Becca Daniels is still trying to figure out what she wants to be when she grows up. What Becca doesn’t want to be is bored. She craves the rush of a new experience, whether it’s an extreme sport, a shocking hair color, or a new guy. That’s why she quit her bookstore job, used her last bit of credit to go skydiving, and broke her leg.



And that’s why, grounded and grumpy, Becca bristles when teased by friends for being commitment-phobic. In response, Becca issues an outrageous wager—that she can sustain a three-month or twenty-five date relationship with the next guy who asks her out. When the guy turns out to be “churchy” Ben—definitely not Becca’s type—she gamely embarks on a hilarious series of dates that plunge her purple-haired, free-speaking, commitment-phobic self into the alien world of church potlucks and prayer meetings.



This irrepressible Getaway Girl will have you cheering her on as she “suffers” through her dates, gains perspective on her life’s purpose, and ultimately begins her greatest adventure of all.



If you'd like to read the first chapter of Becca By The Book, go HERE




books

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Lost the post

Dear Valued readers....
I regret that I've lost an e-mail of one of you valued readers. It was sent to me a few weeks back. It was an award that you awarded my blog. Unfortunately, I have lost it in the past two days. I was going to post it yesterday, but I couldn't find the link in my e-mail messages. Argh! If you remember that you sent me an award and haven't seen that I've posted it up would you please resend the link to me so I can get it posted. I am truly sorry that I lost it. I thought I filed it under to be posted, but I can't find it in the file box and I can't find it in my Inbox . I just saw it yesterday but can't find it now when I want to post it, of course that's par for the course. So I must have clicked on it and made it disappear. I'm good at doing that. I can't for some reason learn how to make them reappear.


books

Lovely Blog award


I have seen this award on other blogs and thought it was just beautiful. I love roses, pink and teacups, lace, you name it anything girlish.

Anyway, Last week Cami over @ Cami's Books awarded me this wonderful award. I first came in contact with Cami's blog when I was sent there for a book giveaway she was having.

I now have the honor of passing on this award to others in accordance with the following rules:

Accept the award, post it on your blog together with the name of the person who has granted the award, and his or her blog link. Pass the award to up to 15 other blogs that you enjoy. Remember to contact the bloggers to let them know they have been chosen for this award.



books

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Teaser Tuesday ~ A Kiss for Cade




Teaser Tuesdays is a weekly bookish meme, hosted by MizB of Should Be Reading. Anyone can play along, so I thought I would play for fun! Just do the following:

  • Grab your current read
  • Open to a random page
  • Share two (2) “teaser” sentences from somewhere on that page
  • BE CAREFUL NOT TO INCLUDE SPOILERS! (make sure that what you share doesn’t give too much away! You don’t want to ruin the book for others!)
  • Share the title & author, too, so that other TT participants can add the book to their TBR Lists if they like your teasers!

"Don't think you're going to kiss me," she declared.

"How else am I going to shut you up?" He grinned at the surprise in her eyes and then lowered his head. He had forgotten how intoxicating she smelled. Too many years had passed since he had kissed her.
Just before their lips met, her fingers clamped around his ear like a bear trap. Words escaped through her clenched teeth. "I said, don't think you're going to kiss me!" She pushed him aside. "Answer my question."



~p. ; A Kiss for Cade by Lori Copeland


books

Kelly's Chance by Wanda E. Brunstetter



This week, the


Christian Fiction Blog Alliance


is introducing


Kelly’s Chance
Barbour Books; Reprint edition (January 1, 2010)


by


Wanda E. Brunstetter






ABOUT THE AUTHOR:



A Note From Wanda:



Ever since I was a child, I wanted to be a writer. When I was in the second grade, I wrote my first poem about a moth. Luckily, I received encouragement from my teacher. During my teen years, I wrote skits that my church teen group performed during special holidays.



It wasn’t until 1980, that I took a course on writing for children and teenagers. I became serious about a career as an author. Soon after that, I began to write stories, articles, poems, and devotionals, which appeared in a variety of Christian publications. Later, I had 5 books of puppet/ventriloquist scripts published. *These books are currently available by contacting me. (wanda@wandabrunstetter.com)



My first novel was released by Barbour Publishing’s book club, Heartsong Presents, in Dec. 1997. I have now written nearly fifty books, with over 4 million books in print. Many of the novels I've written are Amish-themed.





ABOUT THE BOOK





Life for Kelly McGregor is a daily drudge of driving her overbearing father’s mules along Pennsylvania’s Lehigh Canal. She dreams of one day owning an art gallery where her own drawings and paintings are on display. But these dreams don’t include marriage. . .not after seeing what her father has done to her mother. How then can Mike Cooper, a general store owner, make her realize he is different than her father and wants to support her artistic talent? Will Kelly learn that dreams can walk hand in hand with a love created by God?



If you would like to read the first chapter of Kelly’s Chance , go HERE.

My review:

I read this book a few years back as a HeartSong book. It was wonderful. I haven't read this new revised edition; however, I love Wanda's books and have read many of them so without a doubt I would say this is a good one.



books

Monday, January 25, 2010